Sockeye Salmon Prices

The price of sockeye salmon is determined by how much you are willing to order, the price of delivery, and the company/fishermen you’re buying from. The low-mercury content of sockeye makes this fish a great choice for people who want to make seafood a regular part of their diet. By being sure to order the right amount, even households with modest food budgets can get a great sockeye salmon price without sacrificing that straight-from-the-ocean quality of vacuum-sealed fillets.

It’s worth taking the time to do your research. Even among the most reputable salmon companies in Alaska, there can be a big difference in price. You can view sockeye salmon prices from our online marketplace at any time, but the following information can also help you know what to expect and how to get the best price per pound for sockeye.

Sockeye Salmon Price per Pound

As a rough estimate, sockeye salmon might cost somewhere between $15-$30 per pound—or even more for small orders with higher delivery costs. To get all the way down to $15 per pound, you usually need to join some kind of local buying club or make a bulk purchase. Even then, the total price may end up being more like $16-$20 per pound. Because of varying delivery costs and minimum order sizes, the Alaskan salmon company with the best prices depends on how much you’re ordering and the delivery method being used.

Order at least 5 pounds of sockeye salmon from Wild Alaska Direct, and the price is $18.99 per pound with free delivery. The Pride of Bristol Bay offers sockeye prices as low as $16.99 per pound with delivery, but you must order a minimum of 20 lbs. In this context, it’s worth knowing that vacuum-sealed salmon will generally maintain its premium level of freshness for about 6 months. We recommend you eat vacuum-sealed salmon within 12 months of packaging at the latest.

Harvesting, Preparation, Packaging

The company’s harvesting, preparation, and packaging methods will also influence the price. Smaller netting means more of the salmon is pulled from the water while still alive and with minimal trauma. Typically, salmon boats will still at sea and harvest salmon for multiple days. They deposit their salmon catch on tender boats designed to temporarily store the salmon and haul the fish back to shore on a regular basis. More frequent runs to the tender boats mean even fresher salmon.

Most people also prefer at least some level of preparation for their salmon, such as removing the small pin bones and cutting large salmon fillets into individual portions. Some wild salmon companies also provide bone-in, whole salmon fillets. Next, companies need to determine how much ice and gel-packs to use to ensure the salmon remains safely frozen throughout the shipping and delivery process. 

The scale of the salmon company’s operations may also influence the price. Larger companies can negotiate with supply and delivery companies to get a better rate. It gets complicated to guarantee top-level quality with every piece of salmon when harvesting in larger volume. However, there are exceptions. Some larger salmon companies, for example, are established as a collective of individual fishermen who pledge to maintain best practices for salmon harvesting.